Your data is being watched – the Snowden lesson

Some call him a traitor, others call him a whistleblower, but what Edward Snowden has truly done is wake Americans from a dormant sleep of indifference. Snowden’s announcements have been a wake-up call for many Americans that feel safe placing confidential information online. It is a lesson that all individuals should learn; in the era of big data everything you do is being tracked, recorded, and saved for future use.

Many Facebook users, myself included, participate in a “Facebook stalk” – sitting around visiting the pages of your friends, colleagues, acquaintances, and random people you met once at a party. Facebook is tracking exactly what you are searching, what you click on, what your mouse cursor moves over, and the photos you view.  Without a doubt, Facebook understands which advertisements work best on you, your sexual preference and individuals you’re interested in, the restaurants you visited and with whom, the movies you watch, the conversations you have, and the places you have visited.

When the Boston Marathon Bombings occurred, I’m sure that someone called up Mark Zuckerberg to ask whether Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev had Facebook accounts. Is there a doubt in my mind that Zuckerberg doesn’t back up data from everything conducted on Facebook? No.

While “deleting your creeper Facebook Search history” may make you feel more secure from the prying eyes of friends and family, it’s just as unreliable as deleting files off of a computer or deleting your Google Search history. Someone has that data. Think about how the computers of sex offenders or other individuals are confiscated and searched for data. Your information is being stored.

Every tweet you send, note you make, trolling you do on online forums, and email you draft may be watched. Think about the downfall of General Petraeus and the email trick that he used, a trick that is used by terrorists and those looking to hide their search history. He left draft emails that he figured would never be discovered. And we all know how that story ended up.

What can you do? Know that what you search, whether at work, home, or even through Google Incognito has the chance of being recorded. Sure, it may not be a secret that the NSA or CIA may be monitoring for, but what you do is never safe. We are all guilty. Don’t trust the Internet because you have a secure password, instead, research techniques that lesson your likelihood of a problem, while also bearing in mind that what you say is being recorded (also, don’t research things that may be compromising). There are more dangerous things in the world than Trojan Viruses infecting your computer.

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